Friday, 2 November 2018

Freemen of Newcastle Part 3 Barber Surgeons


The earliest records of Barber Surgeons in Newcastle start from 1442.  The oldest minute book is from 1616-1686, order books date from 1619 and apprentice enrolments from 1723 (From Tyne and Wear Archives).
The Arms of the Company of Barber Surgeons in a display
at Tyne and Wear Discovery Museum

Barber surgeons differed from Physicians in that they were trained by trade rather than academically.  They could perform minor surgical procedures such as bloodletting, cupping therapy or pulling teeth.  They could also cut hair, shave or trim facial hair.

A Display of instruments used by barber Surgeons including a
Bone Saw and Amputation Knives at the
Tyne and Wear Discovery Museum
Apprenticeships lasted seven years during which time marriage was forbidden. In 1671 apprentices paid forty shillings at the end of their seven year term in order to become free brothers.  Those who were sons of brothers had to pay thirty three shillings in order to become a free brother.
In the latter part of the eighteenth century the company declined partly due to the growth of hospitals and medical schools as well as the improvement and specialisation of medicine.

John Wouldhave (JO010) 1635-1704)

John was the son of Henry Wouldhave of Newcastle upon Tyne.  He was baptised in Newcastle St John’s in 1635. He was apprenticed to Robert Archbold in 1650 to serve for seven years.  Near the end of this time he and his master were held to account for his marriage to Ann before he had completed his apprenticeship.  In the Minute Book for a meeting on 16 February 1657 the consequences of this are given: John is fined 40 shillings and if Ann was found to be with child before his apprenticeship expired he would be fined 40s for every child.  In November that year John paid his 40s fine for his early marriage and also 40s to be admitted into the Company.

John and Ann’s first child was Margerie, born 2nd August 1661.  They had a second daughter, Bridget, born 1663 and a son, John, born in February 1668.  Ann died in May 1668 and John, no doubt needing someone to look after his very young family, remarried in August 1668.  His wife was Grace Rutter, a widow.
 John is listed as an attendee at many of the meetings in the minute books and he is also listed as attending the burials of other members of the Company.  His signature is in the minute books alongside that of other members of the Company on agreeing changes to their constitution.
John's signature 3rd from the bottom
He became employed directly by the Company of Barber Surgeons and Wax and Tallow Chandlers in 1690; he had a salary of £2 per year.  It isn’t clear what work this involved although it is listed that he provided food (1690), looked after the workmen (1692) and travelled on behalf of the Company (North Shields in 1692). In 1703 it appears that he was provided with a house to live in by the Company, possibly because of his age or physical condition.  He died the next year and was buried in St John’s in October 1704.  He was described as a Barber Surgeon of Manor Chair in All Saints Parish in the register.  The Company paid the church dues and also paid his salary to his wife (£2 and 6 shillings).  His wife Grace was paid various sums during the next few months and then received a ‘pension’ of 10 shillings each year until her death in May 1708.  The Company also paid for her coffin.  

Tuesday, 20 March 2018

Freemen of Newcastle Part 2 Skinners and Glovers


The Skinners were one of the oldest guilds of the town of Newcastle, dating from at least medieval times. Following the dissolution of the monasteries in the reign of Henry VIII, Blackfriars in Newcastle was bought by Newcastle Corporation in 1544 and leased to some of the town’s guilds.  The Skinners and Glovers were based in the buildings of Blackfriars for centuries.  The buildings of Blackfriars survive today forming a picturesque survival from medieval times with small shops and a restaurant.

There were Wouldhaves admitted to and working in the Guild of Skinners and Glovers from the beginning of the seventeenth century until the middle of the eighteenth century, all from one family line. They are all recorded in the registers of St Andrew’s Church, which dates from the late 1100s.
 
The baptismal font at St Andrew's
Church, Newcastle

Thomas is the first Wouldhave mentioned in the registers as a Skinner and Glover. He was possibly born in 1610, the son of Thomas Wouldhave, a yeoman, who died before his son’s birth.  From the books of the Skinners and Glovers, available to view at Tyne and Wear Archives, Thomas was apprenticed to Robert R Bates in 1619. Thomas married Elizabeth Hixson in 1628 and their son Robert was born in 1629. Thomas died in 1653 and in his will he asked to be buried in the Parish Church of St Andrews, on the North side. He left his house to his wife, Elizabeth and another “little house” adjoining it. After her death, the house was to pass onto his son, Robert.  The “little house” was to pass to his daughter Elizabeth after his wife’s death.
Inside St Andrew's Church,
the North Aisle is on the left
of this picture

Robert Wouldhave appears on the list of Newcastle Freemen in 1649 as a Skinner and Glover.  He also was the Parish Clerk of St Andrew’s from 1667.  He seems not to have been successful in the parish clerk role because in 1673 the Vicar complained about his conduct and asked for him to be excommunicated. Robert married Susan Stanger in 1652 and they had a number of children who did not survive infancy.  Their son John (JO039) born in 1671 was entered into the book of Skinners and Glovers in 1677 as a free brother’s son.

John married Ann Smyth in 1695 and their son William (WI039) was born in 1697. John lived in the Groat Market of Newcastle, where he is likely to have sold his wares; he died in 1704 and was buried in the North Aisle of St Andrew’s.  In his will he left all his “ready money, household goods, plate, stock in trade, shop goods and all other effects” to his wife Anne. 

William was apprenticed as a Tanner to Thomas Pattison and appears to have been very successful in this area.  His death notice in the Newcastle Courant in 1759 said
“He had acquired a handsome fortune in the business of a Tanner and Skinner with good character”
William's signature on the will of Susan Hylton

William did not marry.  His will included some small gifts:
·         John Barnes of Sunderland, Boatbuilder £100;
·         William and Francis Stainback , sons of Francis Stainback, late innkeeper of the city of Durham £50 each;
·         Servant Mary Smailes £20;
·         Ralph Smith, saddler’s apprentice in Sunderland, son of Ralph Smith of Sedgefield, Balcksmith, £20.
The residue went to his sole executrix Alice Thompson, wife of Thomas Thompson, Newcastle upon Tyne, Joiner.  It’s not yet clear what relationship there was between William and Alice.
William was also involved in the wool trade.  In some communication with Isaac Wilson in Kendal about an alleged debt for wool received, it is clear that William is dealing in wool of various qualities (Letter available for viewing at Kendal Archives).  Thomas Thompson pursued the debt after William’s death.

Wednesday, 21 February 2018

Wouldhave as a middle name Part 1


The forename of a relative is sometimes used to honour a particular familial connection or heritage. This can be helpful in tracing the ancestry of a person, although it can take some research to find the original connection.  In 1789, the 18th-century inventor William Wouldhave (WI050) proposed a model for a self-righting lifeboat in response to a competition to reward any inventor who could provide a craft for the purpose of saving lives from a shipwreck. 
The monument to Wouldhave and Greathead was used on
commemorative certificates from South Shields
Although his model did not win the competition, William’s concept led to the building of the first lifeboat by Henry Greathead. There was correspondence in local and national newspapers fifty years later, but it wasn’t until  1887 that William Wouldhave was commemorated by the Wouldhave Memorial, at Pier Head, South Shields for his part in the invention of the self-righting lifeboat.  It seems likely that some parents had heard the name Wouldhave from the newspapers and may have had it in mind when they chose a middle name for their child – especially if there was someone in their family with that surname.

The Etherington Family


The Etherington family, originating in the Barnard Castle area, used the middle name Wouldhave for 3 generations and the link to the surname comes from the early 19th century. 

Wouldhave origins
Henry Hutchinson was a whitesmith in Barnard Castle.  A Whitesmith was someone who worked in tin or other light metals.  They worked mostly on cold metals (in comparison to a Blacksmith who worked on hot metals). Henry Hutchinson married two Wouldhave sisters.  In 1803 he married Mary Wouldhave (MA096) born 1778.  Mary died in 1807 aged 29 years, a month after the birth of her daughter Frances.  In 1814 Henry married Mary’s younger sister, Hannah (HA091) born 1786.  Hannah died later in 1814, aged 28 years, two months after the birth of her daughter Mary.
Mary and Hannah were daughters of Michael Wouldhave (MI091) and Hannah formerly Crampton (HA094).  Michael was registered as a Freeman of Newcastle through patrimony, his father having been a Barber Surgeon.  Michael was a woollen stuff maker and dyer (listed in a directory in 1793 of Barnard Castle).
Mary Hutchinson (born 1814), daughter of Henry and Hannah, married Thomas Etherington in Gainford in 1833.  They were living in Gainford in the 1841 census. Thomas was a carpet weaver.  Although the woollen industry was prominent throughout the 18th century in Barnard Castle and the surrounding area, a decline in the demand for woollen cloth early in the 19th century resulted in high unemployment.  In order to make use of the plentiful supplies of wool in the area, manufacturers introduced carpet weaving.  Factories were built along the riverside and by 1834 the town had seven carpet manufacturing businesses.
1st generation
Mary and Thomas had several children including Thomas Wouldhave Etherington (1) born in 1857.  Thomas was also a carpet weaver and he married Mary Jane Robinson at Startforth in 1879.  Thomas died aged 40 years of heart failure and pneumonia.  His family lived in The Bank, in Barnard Castle.  His son, Thomas Wouldhave Etherington (2)was born in 1882. 
2nd generation
Thomas Wouldhave Etherington (2) married Mary Lizzie McKitton in 1907.  His brother John married Annie Mole in 1909.  The both had sons with Wouldhave as a middle name.
3rd generation
Robert Wouldhave Etherington was the son of Thomas (2) and Mary Lizzie. He was born in 1908 and died in 1932.
Thomas Wouldhave Etherington (3) was the son of John and Annie.  He was born in 1909, married Mary I Rutherford in 1932 and died in 2000.

Thursday, 21 September 2017

Freemen of Newcastle Part 1 Ropemakers



Freedom of the City of Newcastle upon Tyne could be claimed in one of two ways. 
Sons of Freemen inherited the Freedom from their fathers i.e. by patrimony. But if the father died before his son’s admission (usually at age of 21years), then they were forfeit of their rights. No illegitimate sons could inherit the franchise.
Freedom was also obtained by serving seven years as an apprentice. Apprentices then gained the right to enter the appropriate trade guild, which in turn gave them the right to seek admission as a Freeman.
Until the Reform Bill of 1832, the Freemen were the only people with the right to vote for their representatives in Parliament.

Thomas Wouldhave (TH040) (1678-1751)
Thomas was a ropemaker and was sworn as a Freeman in 1705. He was listed in the register of Freemen in 1709. He was the son of Thomas Wouldhave of Benwell and his wife Elizabeth Anderson (married in 1672). According to the Ropemakers Book of Enrolments (Tyne and Wear Archives GU.RO/3) Thomas was

apprentice to Rich Hutchinson of Newcastel upon Tyne, Ropemaker for seven years by indenture dated 24th Dec 1692.

And then on

18th December 1693 Thomas Wouldhave late apprentice to Rich Hutchison, he being dead, has chose Wm Robson to serve the remainder of his term with.

Tyneside became world renowned for rope-making in the 1700s. The major feature of roperies was the covered rope path which determined the lengths of the rope that could be made. Near City Road, a 300 yard long rope walk was marked on a map of 1723. Before the process was mechanised, workers walked the length of the rope twisting together, spinning and attaching fibres. It was a laborious process. Long ropes were needed in shipping since splicing shorter ropes made them difficult to get through pulleys.

Thomas married Mary Ellison at St Andrews, Newcastle in 1703 and was sworn in as a Freeman in 1705. In 1704 Thomas and his wife were living in Sidgate and their daughter Elizabeth (EL050) was baptised in Newcastle St Andrews. (Elizabeth later dated aged 13 in 1717).  They lived in this area for many  years, Thomas often acted as a surety for baptism, especially for children of other ropemakers.

Thomas had three sons William (WI040) (1711- 1770s), Thomas (TH041) (1716-1778) and James (JA040) (1717-1788) who lived to maturity.  They were all made Freemen by patrimony in October 1740.

Oath signed by Thomas Wouldhave (TH040)

William (WI040) married Elizabeth Dalgleish in Morpeth in 1740.  It would appear that he became a mariner in about 1747 and later a yeoman (possibly having come into property). His son Richard was a mariner and moved to Hull. (Further information about his family is given in earlier blogs)
Thomas married Elizabeth Heart in 1747.  He moved to North Shields and his son William (WI050) became an inventor (further information is given in earlier blogs)
In the 1741 election of MPs Thomas and his three sons all voted for the same candidate.

Published voting information for 1741 Election in Newcastle


James is also recorded as voting in the elections 1777 and 1780. He was buried in St Nicholas in April 1788.

Mary died in 1732 and Thomas died in 1751; he was buried at All Saints, Newcastle in July. 

Wednesday, 7 June 2017

Cabinet makers, Joiners and Upholsterers

Michael Wouldhave (MI101) married Jane White in September 1806 in Barnard Castle. Michael worked in Barnard Castle as a Cabinet Maker for some years.  All their children were born in Barnard Castle before they moved to the Leeds area in the 1830s. As adults, their children were all involved in cabinet making, upholstery or tailoring. It seems that the family stayed close, even though they had separate businesses, since many of them are at the same address or close to each other in the census data or appear as witnesses or informants for their siblings.

Barnard Castle

Thomas Wouldhave (TH101)1809-1880

Thomas was born in about 1809 and married Mary Wild in 1838 in Leeds. Soon after they married Thomas was accused of an assault on his son, Thomas (TH103).  This is the account given in the Northern Star 8th June 1839
Leeds and West Riding – Charge of Assault
On Wednesday a man named Thomas Wouldhave, a cabinet maker residing in Pottery Field, was charged before the sitting magistrates at the Court House, with an atrocious assault on his own infant, about two years old, the head of the child exhibited serious marks of violence, but there only being the evidence of his wife against him, and he contending that he was striking at her when the child fell on the floor, he was ordered to find sureties to keep the peace for twelve months, himself £20, and two bondsmen £10 each.
In the 1841 census Thomas and Mary appear to be living at separate addresses in Mill Street, Hunslett and their son Thomas is living with his grandmother, Ann Wild, in Park Street, Hunslet.  (This may well have been for economic reasons rather than being related to the assault referred to above.) The family are together in the 1851 census, living at Myrtle Place, Hunslet. In 1861 the family lived in Cankerwell Lane, Leeds and in 1871 in Batchelor Gardens, Bilton, near Harrogate. Thomas’s death was registered in Leeds in 1880 aged 70 years. In the 1881 census Mary (MA108) is living with her sister, Martha, and her brother in law, William Bentley, in Stockton. Thomas and Mary had three children:
  • Thomas (TH103) (about 1838-1911) (we have not yet found his birth record, but he may have been recorded as William Wouldhave in 1837), survived the assault as given above.  He married Louisa Blair in Gateshead in 1869 and they lived in South Shields.  Thomas’s sons, Frederick and George, both served in the First World War. (See previous blogs for their stories)
  • Jane Ann (b1849). In the 1881 census Jane Ann is living with her brother Samuel and her occupation is Music Teacher. She married Alfred Holmes in 1897 in South Shields.
  • Samuel (SA102) (1852-1910) married Caroline Pattison in 1887 in Leeds.  He was in a partnership with Matthew Patterson manufacturing leather ankle straps in 1894.

Michael Wouldhave (MI102) (1812-1870)

Michael was born in 1812 and married Mary Allen in 1857. He was also a cabinet maker and in the 1861 census he is living in Castle St, Leeds. He died in Leeds aged 58 years in 1870.

George Wouldhave (GE101)(1814-1858)

George was born in 1814.  In the 1851 census he is living with his parents and his occupation is Tailor. He was in a Leeds directory list of Tailors in 1842 at 56 Coburg Street, in 1847 at 74 West Street and in Whites directory of 1853 at 5 Great George Street.  He was in business with Alfred Thomas Sanden as tailors and drapers.  They dissolved their partnership by mutual consent on 20th April 1845. He died in 1858 aged 43 years. The cause of death was a visceral malignancy and Michael Wouldhave, his brother, of Castle Street was the informant.

Hannah Wouldhave (HA109) (1817-after 1881)

Hannah was born in 1817 and married Robert Wright in 1842 in Leeds. In the 1851 census she is widowed and living with her brother John Henry in Ripon with her three children, Fanny, Henry and Sarah Jane. In the 1861 census she is living in St James Street, Leeds with her three children and her widowed father.  Her occupation is upholsterer in the 1866 Directory of Leeds.  In 1881 her brother Robert is staying with the family in Preston Street, Leeds. Sarah Jane Wright married Arthur Stead in 1882.  Her son, Willie Wouldhave Stead, a journalist,  died in the First World War in France (see earlier blog).

William Crampton Wouldhave (WI104) 1819 - 1899

William was born in 1819 and married Sarah Thomas in Leeds. In the 1851 census William is living with his family in Farrar Street, Leeds and his occupation is Tailor. In 1861 they are living in Darley Street, Leeds.  By 1881 he has moved to London and was living in Woodstock Street, Westminster; his daughter Sarah is a tailoress, and his son George is a plumber. Woodstock Street is near to the junction between Oxford Street and New Bond Street.  In 1894 he is on the electors list at the Tailors’ Benevolent Institution at Queens Crescent in Kentish Town.  Queen’s Crescent has one of the oldest street markets in London.  The Tailors’ Benevolent Institution was formed in 1837 to provide aid and grants to anyone who had worked in tailoring for a minimum of ten years.  We’re not sure if William was a beneficiary or working for the institution. William died in 1899 aged 80 years.

Robert Wouldhave (RO101)(1812-1883)

Robert was born in 1821 and married Rosetta Churchill, a widow, in 1867 in Harrogate. In the 1871 census he is living in Thomas Yard, Leeds and he is listed in 1872 Whites Directory of Leeds as a tailor at Thomas’s Yard, St James Street. Robert died in 1883 and was buried in Beckett Street cemetery, Leeds. We have not been able to find any reference to Rosetta other than her marriage.

John Henry Wouldhave (JO111)(1824-1874)

John Henry Wouldhave was born in 1824 and married Jane Dunnington (JA105) in 1857.  In 1857 John Henry was living in Commercial Court. In the 1860s’ electoral registers for Leeds he is living in Park Row, Leeds, where he had a half share of the freehold of houses and workshops in Bentick Street. He was in partnership in the company Roberts and Wouldhave.  In the 1861 census, John Henry is described as a master employing 15 men, 5 boys and 7 women.  He seems to have been an enlightened employer as shown in the following newspaper extract from the Leeds Intelligencer 19th May 1866
The strike of Leeds cabinetmakers
This strike still continues, but yesterday (Friday) Messrs Roberts and Wouldhave of Park Row intimated to the men’s committee that they had considered the terms asked – an advance of 2s per week upon the present rate of wages, and a reduction in the hours of labour from 59 to 56 1/2 .  At this establishment, therefore, the men will at once resume work.
In 1868 the partnership was dissolved.  In the Yorkshire Post of 24th Dec 1868 the following article appeared
Roberts and Wouldhave of 14 Park Row, Leeds
The above firm, having dissolved their partnership, the whole of their extensive stock of upholstery and cabinet furniture will be disposed of, and to facilitate a speedy winding up of their affairs, the whole will be sold at a considerable reduction from the ordinary prices for cash only.  Parties about furnishing will find this a rare opportunity of obtaining first class goods at a low price. The extensive showrooms, upholstery work premises and dwelling-house in Park Row to be let and remains of unexpired lease to be disposed of.  The cabinet works with four dwelling houses adjoining, situate in Bentick St, Sunny Bank with all the working plant and material also to be disposed of.
For particulars as to property apply as above or to Messrs Cariss and Tempest Solicitors Leeds. Nov 10th 1868
The family moved to Harrogate in 1871. In the 1871 census they are living at Upper Parliament House on Parliament Street (now part of the commercial area in Harrogate) with one servant.  However it would appear that things were not well financially and in 1873 a notice in the Yorkshire Post indicated that John Henry was liquidating his assets for declaring bankruptcy.  John Henry and Jane moved to London near his brother William Crampton and family.  Sadly they both died in January 1874 within five days of each other.  John Henry’s will was proved by John Lancaster of Hathersage, Derby (a Hotel keeper and a retired Draper).  His effects were less than £200.

His son William (WI110)(1858-1906) became an upholsterer and was living in Hull in the 1901 census. His son Edward (ED102)(1865-1943) also moved to the East Riding; in the 1901 census he is living in York and his occupation is stationer.  He later moved to Hull where he was a manager in a stationery business.
Edward Wouldhave (centre) receiving a retirement gift in 1936

Thursday, 25 May 2017

Cabinet Makers, Joiners and Upholsterers

Historically, the term ‘joiner’ ranks above ‘carpenter’ and below ‘cabinetmaker’. The ‘carpenter ‘was mainly concerned with large work and with comparatively soft woods; the ‘joiner’ was mainly concerned with small work in more expensive and harder woods. A ‘cabinetmaker’ made more elaborate furniture, the term "cabinet" being applied to a piece of furniture consisting of a case or box with doors and drawers. Essentially, a ‘cabinetmaker’ was a woodworker who made cabinets and carried out the finer kind of joiner's work.
With the industrial revolution and the application of steam power to cabinet making tools, mass production techniques were gradually applied to nearly all aspects of cabinet making, and the traditional cabinet shop ceased to be the main source of furniture, domestic or commercial. The Wouldhaves in these occupations would have experienced ongoing change in their working practices throughout the nineteenth century. They may have had their own businesses, employing others, or been employees in large businesses.

Michael Wouldhave MI101

Michael was born in 1781 and lived in Barnard Castle.  He was listed in the Gazeteer of Durham in 1827 as living/trading in the Market Place, Barnard Castle.  He was the son of Michael Wouldhave (MI091)(1745-1812) and Hannah (HA091)(1718-1823) nee Crampton, who lived in Barnard Castle.

St Mary's Barnard Castle


Michael Snr had rights as a Freeman of Newcastle, a member of the barber surgeons. Freedom of the City of Newcastle upon Tyne could be claimed in one of two ways. 

  • Sons of freemen inherited the freedom from their fathers i.e. by patrimony. But if the father died before his son’s admission (usually at age of 21years), then they were forfeit of their rights. No illegitimate sons could inherit the franchise.
  • Freedom was also obtained by serving seven years as an apprentice. Apprentices then gained the right to enter the appropriate trade guild, which in turn gave them the right to seek admission as a Freeman.
Until the Reform Bill of 1832, the Freemen were the only people with the right to vote for their representatives in Parliament. Michael (MI091) was listed as a voter in the poll book for Newcastle of 1777-1780. He was a Freeman by patrimony – his father William was a Freeman. Michael Jnr (MI101) may have become a Freeman (on payment of the admission fee) but we have not found any evidence yet to show that he did.

Poll Book for Newcastle 1877


Michael (MI101) married Jane White in September 1806 in Barnard Castle. Michael worked in Barnard Castle as a Cabinet Maker for some years (in the Pigot’s directory of 1828-29 Michael is listed as a cabinet maker on Market Place and also in charge of the Fleece Inn), until he moved to Leeds with his family sometime in 1830s. Leeds occupied an increasingly favourable position as a trading centre in the North of England during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. According to a Leeds directory of 1839 Michael was a joiner and cabinet maker at Pottery Field and in 1842 Michael is listed at Coburg Street in Leeds. In the 1851 census Michael is living with his family in West Avenue in the St Andrew’s district of Leeds. In 1861 he was a widower living in St James Street with his daughter Hannah (grandmother to Willie Wouldhave Stead – see blog of First World War Wouldhaves part 2).

Jane died in 1851 aged 73 years and Michael died in 1865 aged 84 years. They had a large family, several of whom were also involved as cabinet makers, tailors or upholsterers. All of their children were born in Barnard Castle.
  • Sarah Wouldhave (SA103) was born 1807 and married Thomas Bowman in 1827 at Gainford.  Sarah was widowed by the time of the 1851 census; Sarah and her son, Joseph Bowman, were living with her parents in Leeds.  Joseph was listed as a Cabinet Maker.
  • Thomas Wouldhave (TH101) was born in 1809 and married Mary Wild in 1838 in Leeds. Thomas was a Cabinet Maker in the 1851, living at Myrtle Place, Hunslet.
  • Michael Wouldhave (MI102) was born in 1812 and married Mary Allen in 1857. He was also a cabinet maker and in the 1861 census he is living in Castle St, Leeds.
  • George Wouldhave (GE101) was born in 1814.  In the 1851 census he is living with his parents and his occupation is Tailor.
  • Hannah Wouldhave (HA109) was born in 1817 and married Robert Wright in 1842 in Leeds.  In the 1861 census she is widowed and living in St James Street, Leeds with her three children and her widowed father.  Her occupation is upholsterer.
  • William Crampton Wouldhave (WI104) was born in 1819 and married Sarah Thomas in Leeds. In the 1851 census William is living with his family in Farrar Street, Leeds and his occupation is Tailor. In 1861 they are living in Darley Street, Leeds.  By 1881 he has moved to London and is living in Woodstock Street, Westminster; his daughter Sarah is a tailoress.
  • Robert Wouldhave (RO101) was born in 1821 and married Rosetta Churchill, a widow, in 1867 in Harrogate. In the 1871 census he is living in Thomas Yard, Leeds. 
  • John Henry Wouldhave (JO111) was born in 1824 and married Jane Dunnington in 1857.  John Henry was an upholsterer and employed a number of men.
Marriage entry for William Crampton Wouldhave (WI104)


Further information about Michael's children will be given in a later blog.

Wednesday, 19 April 2017

First World War Wouldhaves part 5

George Jackson Wouldhave and Thomas Wouldhave


Parents

George Jackson Wouldhave(GE108)  and Thomas Wouldhave (TH104) were brothers (born fifteen years apart), sons of Richard Wouldhave and Ellen Wells. Richard Wouldhave (RI103) was the son of Richard Wouldhave (RI102) and Jane Jackson (see blog North Shields Wouldhaves part 3).  Richard (RI103) was born in 1856 in North Shields and christened in the Middle Street Mission.  He married Ellen Wells in August 1875.  He had various occupations connected to the sea; shipyard labourer, seaman, waterman, mariner and steamboat fireman.  

Thomas Wouldhave (TH104)

Thomas Wouldhave from his Merchant
Marine Index Card

Family

Thomas was born on 2nd September 1876, the eldest of twelve children, only seven of whom remained alive at the time of the 1911 census. He married Helen Lauder in October 1899 in Christchurch, North Shields.  Helen (HE102) was the daughter of Alexander and Margaret Lauder; Alexander was an iron ship builder and lived in Chirton, just to the west of North Shields. In the 1901 census they are living in Nile Street, North Shields and Thomas is given the occupation Seaman. They had three daughters, Helen Lauder Wouldhave (1901) Gladys Lauder (1904)and Beatrice (1906), and one son Thomas (1900).  Both Beatrice and Thomas sadly died the same year they were born. In the 1911 census both daughters, Helen and Gladys, are with their grandparents, Richard and Ellen, in King Street, North Shields.  Their mother Helen is with her parents Alexander and Margaret Lauder in Front Street, Chirton. Thomas, a merchant seaman, was presumably at sea at the time of the census. The two daughters later married, Helen to John Wilkinson in 1927 and Gladys to Robert Todd in 1929. Helen Wouldhave (HE102) died in mid 1915, aged 35, in North Shields.

War Service

Thomas was a merchant seaman.  His registration documents state that he had brown hair and brown eyes, was 5ft 6ins tall and had a tattoo of faith hope and charity on his right arm. He enlisted 9th Jan 1915 into the RNR Trawler section as a Boiler fireman. He served on HMS Island Prince which was a Tyne trawler requisitioned by the Royal Navy as a mine sweeper. He received the Distinguished Service medal in recognition of services in Mine-sweeping operations between 1st July 1916 and 31st March 1917.  He had the rank of Ensign, 2nd Engineman RNR. 

After the War

Thomas continued with his Merchant Marine career.  He was listed on the Trojan Prince as a member of the crew arriving at Ellis Island in 1920. He was also listed on the Merchant Marine index in 1935 and 1939. Thomas died in 1960 in North Shields aged 84 years.

George Jackson Wouldhave (GE108)

As merchant mariners, Thomas and George
Jackson would have known this landmark
overlooking the Quayside in North Shields


Family

George Jackson was born on 18th September 1891. He was probably named after his father’s brother George Jackson Wouldhave (1861-1867). He married Nancy Matthewson in 1915. We haven’t been able to find any further information about this marriage, whether there were any children or when Nancy died.  

War Service

George Jackson was also in the merchant marine.  In the 1911 census his occupation is given as Engineers  Apprentice. All we have found of his war service is his medal card.  He was awarded the Mercantile Marine Ribbon, and the British Medal ribbon in 1919 and the Mercantile Marine Medal in 1921.

After the War

The New York Passenger lists include George J Wouldhave arriving at Ellis Island in June 1918 aged 26 years and in 1923 he is listed as an Engineer (4) on board the S/S Lucerna in the inter-war list of Merchant Mariners. In the 1939 register, George is living in Hedley St, Percy Main and his occupation is Tool fitter. Although it gives his status as married, his wife is not at the same address. George married again in 1948 to Margaret Lillie. In 1939 register, Margaret is a Nursing Auxilliary. George Jackson died in 1967 in North Shields and Margaret in 1977.